Best-Sellers: June 11-17

Information is courtesy of Giovanni’s Room, 345 S. 12th St.; (215) 923-2960; www.giovannisroom.com. Ten-percent off most hardcover in-store sales.

BOOKS

GAY MEN’S

1. “Probation,” by Tom Mendocino (Kensington Press, 304 pp., $15 pb). In this timely and provocative novel from an authentic new voice in fiction, Mendicino explores how a closeted gay man’s decision to marry impacts his life and the people he loves, and what happens when the lies unravel. 2. “What We Remember,” by Michael Thomas Ford (Kensington Press, 362 pp., $15 pb). Award-winning author Ford returns with his most ambitious novel to date, in which a father’s disappearance has a profound effect on his three children and causes secrets and lies to be exposed. 3. “Murder On Camac,” by Joseph DeMarco (Lethe, 396 pp., $18 pb). Gunned down in the street, author Helmut Brandt’s life ebbs away and puts a chain of events in motion that place P.I. Marco Fontana on a collision course with the church and local community. 4. “Silver Lake,” by Peter Gadol (Tyrus Books, 290 pp., $14.95 pb). Called compulsively readable, the novel combines all the suspense of a psychological thriller with beautifully observed details of contemporary domestic life in Los Angeles. This is a haunting book full of both beauty and dread.” 5. “Moonlit Earth,” by Christopher Rice (Scibners, 368 pp., $25 hb). Rice returns with his first female protagonist since “The Snow Garden.” In his latest, he delivers a compelling psychological thriller about a young woman who must act to save her brother’s reputation and life when he is accused of being involved in a terrorist event. 6. “Chasing Smoke,” by K. A. Mitchell (Samhain Publishing, 264 pp., $15 pb). With his boyfriend pressuring Daniel Gardner for a serious commitment, Christmas with Daniel’s family seems like a welcome escape. But his old house holds more than memories of a miserable adolescence. It also has Daniel’s former flame, Trey Eriksson. 7. “Rancid Pansies,” by James Hamilton-Paterson (Europa Editions, 288 pp., $15.95 pb). Book Three in the Gerald Samper series finds Samper recuperating in Sussex when he learns that film rights to his book on Millie Cleatathe have been sold. This windfall is sufficient to finance a return to Italy — and his dream to write the libretto for an opera. 8. “Workin’ It! RuPaul’s Guide to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Style,” by RuPaul (It Books, 192 pp., $19.99 hb, less 10 percent in the store). More than just a style guide, this is a navigation system through the bumpy road of life. Let RuPaul teach you the tried, tested and found true techniques that will propel you from background player to shining star!

LESBIAN

1. “Morning Haiku,” by Sonia Sanchez (Beacon Press, 144 pp., $19.95 hb). This new volume by the much-loved poet Sonia Sanchez, her first in over a decade, is music to the ears: a collection of haiku that celebrates the gifts of life and mourns the deaths of revered African-American figures in the worlds of music, literature, art and activism. 2. “Under the Sheets,” by Gweneth Ferdinand (Xlibris, 230 pp., $19.99 pb). A story of love, lust and drama as multiple women are connected through friendship, love and hardship. 3. “The Other Side of Paradise: A Memoir,” by Staceyann Chin (Scribner, 282 pp., $16 pb). A brave and fiercely candid memoir about growing up in Jamaica by performer, activist and writer Chin. 4. “Lily of the Tower,” by Ellen Hart (Bella, 261 pp, $14.95 pb) The country house has a secret: Washed up by a storm at the gates of the local estate, young Agnes Headey has a first impression of brooding silence and faded elegance. When she learns that Master Netherfield’s sister is not dead, as all had presumed, she undertakes secret visits to the gentle but troubled woman. 5. “I Can’t Think Straight,” by Shamim Sarif (Enlightment Press, 204pp., $15.95 pb). Two women fall in love on the eve of one woman’s wedding. Although they come from different worlds, the attraction between Tala and Leyla is immediate and Tala must decide whether to stay true to her culture or to her heart. 6. “Awakening to Sunlight,” by Lindsey Stone (Bold Strokes, 231 pp., $16.95 pb). Judith Hilford flees from an emotionally abusive relationship and accepts temporary lodging arranged by a friend until she can set her life on a new course. 7. “Babyji,” by Abha Dawesar, (Anchor, 368 pp., $15 pb). A sexy, surprising, subversively wise new novel about an Indian Lolita and her quest to conquer love and life. 8. “Long Shot,” by D. Jackson Lee (Bold Strokes, 231 pp., $16.95 pb). Equine veterinarian Tory Greyson has always played the safe bet, that is, until she runs into a very cute, opinionated, jobless journalist.

DVDs

LESBIAN

1. “And Then Came Lola,” directed by Ellen Seidler and Megan Siler (2009, 70 min., $24.95) This wonderfully fun and sexy lesbian romp takes a whiz-bang tour through the streets of San Francisco as photographer Lola races to get to a crucial meeting on time. As usual, Lola is running late. Her job and her girlfriend Casey are on the line and Lola has three chances (a la the art-house classic “Run, Lola, Run”) to make it right. 2. “Wanda Sykes: I’ma Be Me,” starring Wanda Sykes (2009, 60 min., $19.95). Dominating everything from television sitcoms to feature films, this out comedian extraordinaire has returned in her second solo comedy special. 3. “The Lovers & Friends Show, Season 1,” directed by Charmain Johnson (2008, 163 min., $19.95). Six lesbian women of color navigate through life’s obstacles, making new friends and experiencing new drama. 4. “Steam,” directed by Kyle Schickner (2009, 120 min., $24.98). This terrific new drama unfolds the stories of three amazing and very different women whose paths cross in a steam room. 5. “The Guitar,” directed by Amy Redford (2008, 93 min., $26.95). A captivating portrait of a woman’s self-empowerment (including a tryst with the pizza delivery girl). 6. “The Crash Pad,” directed by Shine Louise Houston (2006, 60 min. $34.95). “This is the key to the crash pad, and I want to give it to you. You’re guaranteed a panty-dropping good time” in this lesbian/queer/feminist porn flick. 7. “The L Word: Final Season” directed by Angela Robinson (2008, 438 min., $49.95). It’s the final season of the show that won our hearts and got us talking about its unwavering dedication to portraying sexy lesbian characters in a steady stream of increasingly hot and wild story lines. 8. “Truth Hall,” directed by Jade-Jenise Dixon (2009, 88 min., $14.98). Secrets come out and hearts get broken when old friends reunite for a wedding in this bold urban dramedy. 9. “Shelter Me,” directed by Marco S. Puccioni (2008, 94 min., $29.95). A married college professor falls in love with one of her students.

GAY MEN’S

1. “Gods of Football: The Making of the 2009 Calendar,” directed by Grant Carroll (2009, 80 minutes, $24.95). Australia’s hottest footballers (rugby players) naked for a cause. They bare it all for breast-cancer research. 2. “Shelter,” directed by Jonah Markowitz (2007, 88 min., $24.95). For Zach, an aspiring artist fresh out of high school forced to skip out on college to provide for his family, he fears having no life of his own until surfing becomes his only solace. 3. “House of Usher,” directed by David DeCocteau (2008, 83 min., $19.98). An erotic twist on Edgar Allen Poe’s masterpiece, when Victor visits his first love Roderick Usher at his crumbling family estate, he finds Roderick and his sister decaying before his eyes. Soon Victor learns the terrifying secret that’s been keeping them alive. 4. “Newcastle,” directed by Dan Castle (2008, 107 min., $24.95). A coming-of-age tale combining the gorgeous Australian surfer beaches with the raw energy, music and rebellion of teen culture. 5. “Soldier’s Girl,” directed by Frank Pierson (2003, 111 min., $14.95). The film is based on the true story of 21-year-old Private Barry Winchell, who fell in love with a beautiful transgender nightclub performer. Their love affair created an uproar among Winchell’s fellow soldiers, particularly upsetting his macho roommate Justin, whose desire to control resulted in tragedy. 6. “Eating Out 3: All You Can Eat,” directed by Glenn Gaylord (2009, 80 min., $24.95). Casey is new to the gay scene, refreshingly cute, geeky and extremely shy. When bombastic Tiffani befriends Casey and takes him under her wing, his adventures have only just begun! 7. “College Boys Live,” directed by George O’Donnell (2009, 94 min., $29.95) In a quiet Orlando, Fla., suburb, three young men struggle to escape the wreckage of their pasts and create new lives for themselves. Their new home is CollegeBoysLive.com, a voyeuristic-Web-cam house rigged with 32 cameras, where their every move is watched by thousands of paying members. This intimate and provocative film examines complex subculture, but at its heart the film is about the universal search for family and acceptance. 8. “Breakfast with Scot,” directed by Laurie Lynd (2007, 109 min., $24.95). The lives of Eric, an ex-hockey player, and his partner Sam are thrown into turmoil when they are forced to take in Scot, a flamboyant 11-year-old. 9. “Little Ashes,” directed by Paul Morrison (2008, 112 min., $26.98). In 1922, as Madrid wavers on the edge of social change, Salvador Dali is drawn into the decadent lifestyle of Federico Garcia Lorca and Luis Bunuel. But as the three explore the art world together, a forbidden attraction develops during these socially rebellious times.